First Degree Murder Case Resolved by Pleas to Robbery, Involuntary Manslaughter

DISCLAIMER: The results are specific to the facts and legal circumstances of each of the clients' cases and should not be used to form an expectation that the same results could be obtained for other clients in similar matters without reference to the specific factual and legal circumstances of each client's case.

Seventeen-year-old Rustam Fardin was arrested in August 2019 and charged with first degree murder, attempted murder, conspiracy to commit murder, aggravated malicious wounding, robbery with the use of a firearm, and two counts of use of a firearm to commit a felony. The allegations against Rustam were related to claims of a murder conspiracy that occurred on July 3, 2019, leading to the death of one person and a devastating injury to another. Two others were charged in the incident, including the actual killer, who was convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison.
 
Despite the horrific allegations, on August 12, 2020, Stafford County Circuit Court Judge Charles Sharp sentenced Rustam to a sentence of ten years to serve, in substantial contrast to the sentence of the co-defendant. 
 
In the weeks leading up to Rustam’s trial, Peter Greenspun and our attorneys entered into extensive discussions with the prosecutors, distinguishing Rustam’s history and involvement in the crime from that of the actual killer. Following these numerous discussions and continued investigation and analysis of the evidence, the Commonwealth offered a plea of involuntary manslaughter, two counts of robbery, and one count of use of a firearm in the course of a felony, which Rustam accepted. The plea agreement included a 20-year cap on time to serve and was accepted by the court at the plea hearing.

After considering all of the facts, the support that family and friends have for this young man, and the mental health evaluation that was submitted to the court, Judge Sharp imposed a sentence of 33 years. However, 23 years of the sentence were suspended, so that Rustam’s imposed sentence to serve is ten years, half of the agreed-to sentencing cap set forth in the plea agreement.
 
Rustam is committed to learning from his wrongs and to assuring that he will be a meaningful, productive, and contributing member of the community after he has served his time.
 
This was a serious, difficult, and tragic case. Greenspun Shapiro is grateful to have been able to help this young man.

 

You can read more about the details of this case on The Free Lance-Star website. 

Favorable Plea Agreement